3 months ago

XX reasons why you should be cheering for…Buzzfeed revenue?

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Scrolling my newsfeed I’ve noticed a status update that Davor Bruketa of Bruketa&Zinic posted tagging some of his friends. It’s a link to 11 Reasons Why You Should Cheer For Croatia, a typical buzzfeed list. But what struck my attention is why would a tech savy professional share such click-bait material? As it turns out, Buzzfeed has a World Cup feed over at Buzzfeed.com/worldcup and every few days they make up a pretty noninteresting list of facts about national teams that will be participating in the Cup such as 15 Reasons You Should Be Cheering For Uruguay During The World Cup, 11 Things You Need To Know About Russia’s World Cup Team etc., you get it. This is nothing new for Buzzfeed, an exploiter of all things interesting, viral and noteworthy. By saying that, I mean that I sometimes find myself relating to some of their lists and saying to myself: “of course! “,“Spot on!“. The list maker, myself and other connoisseurs of 36 Pop Punk Albums You Need To Hear Before You F——ing Die are on the same wavelength because some of those lists are made by insiders of that topic. This is not the case with these World Cup lists, Americans are not soccer (football) people. They might be developing a sports culture of that sort but I doubt that Conz Preti, Luke Bailey and Matt Kiebus etc. really know what they are doing here, as they have compiled most of these lists for every one of these World Cup national teams. That’s their job and we can’t blame them for trying but it just doesn’t seem to justify the uninterestingness. Maybe Buzzfeed readership doesn’t care about soccer? Their 51.3% American percentage of visitors shure indicates something, but whatever it indicates, Americans (as they so often do, to generalize) should not get lousy info about something that they initially know little about, and international readers should not joyously perpetuate Buzzfeed’s weak spots. Or am I just expecting waaaaaay too much out of a site like Buzzfeed?! Am i just obsessed with analyzing my feeds?! Either way-just because your National team got mentioned on Buzzfeed doesn’t make it cool.

Written by: Luka Tomas

3 months ago

40 maps that explain the internet

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it’s used by people around the world.

3 months ago

1 note(s)

High Quality


“I came up with the idea of having quotation marks on each side, creating glasses that can trigger the imagination. The shop owner loved the idea, and said, ‘Well why not just put them in production?’ Now, another meaning of quotation marks is that what you see between them, what you read between them, is a quote from somebody else. And if what you see through your glasses is a quote, then you can start looking at things from different perspectives. My spectacles, drawn with clean lines, carry the name: Quotation Marks. They were created not only for their form, but also most emphatically for their content.”

I came up with the idea of having quotation marks on each side, creating glasses that can trigger the imagination. The shop owner loved the idea, and said, ‘Well why not just put them in production?’ Now, another meaning of quotation marks is that what you see between them, what you read between them, is a quote from somebody else. And if what you see through your glasses is a quote, then you can start looking at things from different perspectives. My spectacles, drawn with clean lines, carry the name: Quotation Marks. They were created not only for their form, but also most emphatically for their content.”

3 months ago

389585 note(s)

Reblogged From:
newsweek

WORD.

(Source: twoheadedshark)

3 months ago

What the Fuck Happened to Indie Rock?

I blame the Hold Steady because they wrote songs about songs, about being a fan, about identifying as punk or hardcore at one point but that, well, that was a long time ago, when we were young and the Jersey shore breathed hot against our necks or something, about being a white middle class indie dude as though this were something inherently worth documenting.(…)being a fan and a “regular dude” who just liked the sweet jams of his youth had never been romanticized to such a degree.(…)Rock and pop music has always been egocentric. To appeal to teenagers it damn well better be. But now that teenagers truly couldn’t be bothered with rock—particularly of the “indie” variety—rock music, while keeping the narcissism, has applied it to the most relentlessly boring life choices a man can make; good college, good brews, good stories (alive purely in the past tense), good jobs, good living, good death. Indie rock music is now every character in The Graduate.(…)But loving one’s mother and father and memorializing those we purport to love isn’t a brave or radical act of honesty; it’s the bare minimum. In this case the dead don’t get the art they’re said to deserve, but those left behind sure get a nifty album. Real Estate’s album is John Updike as college rock; rural reverie with just enough grey skies to be mistaken as meaningful.(…)OK. That is entirely not fair, to either artist. I’m being a click-bait prick because black metal and hardcore isn’t getting the love my perpetually adolescent self wants for it (…)I don’t want my, our, or your middle class existence justified, I want it burned down and the wretched earth below it salted and its loss to be forever unmourned. I want shame and rage and self-loathing so deep that I can sail a Chrysler as big as a whale across it. I want hatred so over the top that it’s interchangeable with love. I want 24/7 Kraken. At least that’s what I want from bands I listen to. I want total destruction, not bland reinforcement.

Or I want a nice song I can dance to. Dancing is lovely, isn’t it?

3 months ago

The Toxins That Threaten Our Brains

By age two, almost all of the billions of brain cells that you will ever have are in their places. Except in the hippocampus and one or two other tiny regions, the brain does not grow new brain cells throughout your life. When brain cells die, they are gone. So its initial months of formation, when the brain is most vulnerable, are critical. “During these sensitive life stages,” Grandjean and Landrigan write, exposure “can cause permanent brain injury at low levels that would have little or no adverse effect in an adult.”(…)Scientists enroll pregnant female subjects and carefully record objective measures of environmental exposure, using things like blood samples, urine samples, and maybe even dust and air samples from their homes. After the babies are born, the researchers follow up with them at various points in their childhoods. These studies are expensive and take a long time, but they’re incomparably good at connecting prenatal exposures with lost IQ points, shortened attention span, or emergence of ADHD.(…)Low-income parents might not have access to organic produce or be able to guarantee their children a low-lead household. When it comes to brain development, this puts low-income kids at even greater disadvantages—in their education, in their earnings, in their lifelong health and well-being.

3 months ago

Upton Sinclair famously declared that “it is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

Real wages for most US workers have increased little if at all since the early 1970s, but wages for the top one percent of earners have risen 165 percent, and wages for the top 0.1 percent have risen 362 percent. If Rastignac were alive today, Vautrin might concede that he could in fact do as well by becoming a hedge fund manager as he could by marrying wealth.(…)Capital in the Twenty-First Century makes it clear that public policy can make an enormous difference, that even if the underlying economic conditions point toward extreme inequality, what Piketty calls “a drift toward oligarchy” can be halted and even reversed if the body politic so chooses.(…)what matters is the after-tax return on wealth. So progressive taxation—in particular taxation of wealth and inheritance—can be a powerful force limiting inequality. Indeed, Piketty concludes his masterwork with a plea for just such a form of taxation. Unfortunately, the history covered in his own book does not encourage optimism.(…)Upton Sinclair famously declared that “it is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” Piketty, looking at his own nation’s history, arrives at a similar observation: “The experience of France in the Belle Époque proves, if proof were needed, that no hypocrisy is too great when economic and financial elites are obliged to defend their interest.”(…)So Capital in the Twenty-First Century is an extremely important book on all fronts. Piketty has transformed our economic discourse; we’ll never talk about wealth and inequality the same way we used to.

3 months ago

Grandma's Experiences Leave Epigenetic Mark on Your Genes | DiscoverMagazine.com

…If diet and chemicals can cause epigenetic changes, could certain experiences — child neglect, drug abuse or other severe stresses — also set off epigenetic changes to the DNA inside the neurons of a person’s brain? That question turned out to be the basis of a new field, behavioral epigenetics, now so vibrant it has spawned dozens of studies and suggested profound new treatments to heal the brain.(…)The mechanisms of behavioral epigenetics underlie not only deficits and weaknesses but strengths and resiliencies, too. And for those unlucky enough to descend from miserable or withholding grandparents, emerging drug treatments could reset not just mood, but the epigenetic changes themselves. Like grandmother’s vintage dress, you could wear it or have it altered. The genome has long been known as the blueprint of life, but the epigenome is life’s Etch A Sketch: Shake it hard enough, and you can wipe clean the family curse.(…)“It sounded like voodoo at first,” Szyf admits. “For a molecular biologist, anything that didn’t have a clear molecular pathway was not serious science. But the longer we talked, the more I realized that maternal care just might be capable of causing changes in DNA methylation, as crazy as that sounded. So Michael and I decided we’d have to do the experiment to find out.”(…)Why can’t your friend “just get over” her upbringing by an angry, distant mother? Why can’t she “just snap out of it”? The reason may well be due to methyl groups that were added in childhood to genes in her brain, thereby handcuffing her mood to feelings of fear and despair. (…)“The thing I’ve gained from the work I do is that stress is a big suppressor of maternal behavior,” she says. “We see it in the animal studies, and it’s true in humans. So the best thing you can do is not to worry all the time about whether you’re doing the right thing. Keeping the stress level down is the most important thing. And tactile interaction — that’s certainly what the good mother rats are doing with their babies. That sensory input, the touching, is so important for the developing brain.

3 months ago

1 note(s)

Where Do Eureka Moments Come From?

10 months ago

The need to portray life as it is style of expression has worked. The youthful idealism and the realism of broken lives comes expected, but that is why we love this so much, it comes expected in an industry of crowd pleasers as a refuge from shiny plastic people and becomes a movie of great emotional resonance to which someone can actually relate.

SHORT TERM 12 (2013), Directed by Destin Cretton

Developing a flow of seamless empathy that spans the entire film is a feat in itself, but doing it with style and ease is even more rewarding. Cretton`s full length adaptation of his 2009 short is wonderful, full of doubts, insecurities, that is to say-very human. In its wanting to portray a situation In which the filmmaker has been himself (Cretton has worked at a group home for at-risk teens), the movie feel right, the scenes ring true and the dialog is in place. At this point in 2013 we can easily say that it represents the best of American independent cinema, no gimmicks, conversation and mood centered, engaging camera work and cinema verité kind of acting. The opening and closing dialogs in the movie are indicative of a cultural frame, youthful but centered around experiences that deal with the kids, with no excess baggage it curls a smile on our faces. The need to portray life as it is looms over this style of expression and there is nothing wrong with that sort of realism. The youthful idealism and the realism of broken lives comes expected, but that is why we love this so much, it comes expected in an industry of crowd pleasers as a refuge from shiny plastic people and becomes a movie of great emotional resonance to which someone can actually relate.

The main character, Grace played by Larson Brie is an emotional wreck herself, holding it all together when at work only to fall apart any other chance she gets. Striking a balance between her own issues and the kids at short term 12 she is always marked by her caring and involvement. That is the soul food that drives her work, and also the baggage that stains her relationship with her 3 year boyfriend and co-worker Mason. The movie takes us into their lives to reveal the backbone of Grace`s involvement and care that goes into her work with the kids. The kids themselves are a great bunch, with Keith Stanfield as Marcus standing out as the oldest and most troubled alongside Kaitlyn Dever as Jayden. Much of the plot is situated in the group home, portraying situations like group meetings, individual relationships and transferring the aura of the home for us to feel.

Short term 12 is an easily watchable film, its narrative doesn`t give way to experimentation or long meditative shots, it`s theme and feeling come out of the situation the film depicts. The pacing is just right, and it doesn`t drop throughout the 96 minutes. Considering the neurotic outbursts that arise in many of the characters, it has no ups and downs in attention span, it just flows.